Nashua, NH Dentist
Nashua Smile Makers
76 Allds Street
Nashua, NH 03060
(603) 882-3727
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Posts for: February, 2020

By Nashua Smile Makers
February 20, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Implants  

How dental implants from your dentists in Nashua, NH, can restore your smile

Having dental implants placed may be one of the most important and beneficial choices you will ever make. Dental implants restore your smile and your chewing function, giving you the ability to enjoy eating again, and helping your digestion and overall health. Dental implants also give you back your self-esteem and self-confidence by creating an outstanding, beautiful smile.

Here at Nashua Smile Makers in Nashua, NH, your dentists, Dr. Salvatore Guerriero and Dr. Salvatore Coletta offer dental implant treatment to restore your smile and enhance your life—read on to learn more.

What dental implants can do for you

Your smile is one of your most important assets, and dental implants can give you a memorable smile that gets noticed. You will feel confident, knowing you look your best. You can also get back to enjoying eating the foods you love, without worrying about lost teeth.

People love dental implants because they offer so many benefits. Consider that dental implants:

  • Look naturally beautiful, because the implant crowns are made of light-reflective materials that closely resemble tooth enamel
  • Will never move around, because the implants are surrounded and embedded in bone, making them completely stable
  • Are easy to maintain, because you simply brush and floss them just like natural teeth

This treatment also helps to conserve the jawbone because your body creates more bone to fuse with the dental implants themselves, locking them in place. More bone means a firmer jawline, as well as more youthful facial contours.

Dental implants are also the most successful surgical implant today, boasting a success rate of over 95 percent, according to the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. That’s because dental implants are made of titanium, a biocompatible material that your body won’t reject. You can count on dental implants to give you a superb tooth replacement.

Contact us

To learn more about the importance of dental implants and how they can restore your smile, call your dentists in Nashua, New Hampshire, Dr. Salvatore Guerriero and Dr. Salvatore Coletta at Nashua Smile Makers at 603-882-3727.


RemovingOneorMoreTeethCouldImproveOrthodonticOutcomes

Moving teeth through orthodontics may involve more than simply wearing braces. There are many bite conditions that require extra measures before, during or after traditional orthodontic treatment to improve the outcome.

One such measure is extracting one or more teeth. Whether or not we should will depend on the causes behind a patient's poor dental bite.

Here, then, are 4 situations where tooth extraction before orthodontics might be necessary.

Crowding. This happens when the jaw isn't large enough to accommodate all the teeth coming in. As a result, later erupting teeth could erupt out of position. We can often prevent this in younger children with space maintainers or a palatal expander, a device which helps widen the jaw. Where crowding has already occurred, though, it may be necessary to remove selected teeth first to open up jaw space for desired tooth movement.

Impacted teeth. Sometimes an incoming tooth becomes blocked and remains partially or fully submerged beneath the gums. Special orthodontic hardware can often be used to pull an impacted tooth down where it should be, but not always. It may be better to remove the impacted tooth completely, as well as its matching tooth on the other side of the jaw to maintain smile balance before orthodontically correcting the bite.

Front teeth protrusion. This bite problem involves front teeth that stick out at a more horizontal angle. Orthodontics can return the teeth to their proper alignment, but other teeth may be blocking that movement. To open up space for movement, it may be necessary to remove one or more of these obstructing teeth.

Congenitally missing teeth. The absence of permanent teeth that failed to develop can disrupt dental appearance and function, especially if they're near the front of the mouth. They're often replaced with a dental implant or other type of restoration. If only one tooth is missing, though, another option would be to remove the similar tooth on the other side of the jaw, and then close any resulting gaps with braces.

Extracting teeth in these and other situations can help improve the chances of a successful orthodontic outcome. The key is to accurately assess the bite condition and plan accordingly.

If you would like more information on orthodontic options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removing Teeth for Orthodontic Treatment.”


GiveYourChildAddedProtectionAgainstCavitiesWithTopicalFluoride

Keeping your child’s teeth and gums healthy may sometimes seem like “one step forward, two steps back.” You do all the right things like daily brushing and flossing, and keeping sugar consumption to a minimum. But they’re still getting too many cavities.

We can add something else to what you’re already doing to decrease their cavity rate: apply a concentrated fluoride mixture (stronger than what’s found in toothpaste or drinking water) directly to their teeth. Studies have shown that topical fluoride is effective at reducing the risk of new cavities in children at high risk for decay, and may even reverse early decay.

Topical fluoride can be applied as a gel, foam or varnish. The particular method used depends on factors like the child’s age or the preference of the dentist. But any of the three methods can deliver a short-term, high dose of fluoride to the teeth.

As a result, the burst of fluoride strengthens tooth enamel against decay, with plenty of evidence of its effectiveness. As such, the American Dental Association recommends periodic topical fluoride applications for children older than 6, and especially those that appear to be at higher risk for decay.

You might, however, be concerned about the long-term health effects of these stronger concentrations of fluoride. Again, research indicates that the only long-term hazard associated with too much fluoride is a condition called fluorosis, which produces heavy tooth staining. Fluorosis, though, is more of an appearance issue and doesn’t harm the tooth itself. And it can be avoided in the case of topical fluoride by performing the procedure correctly and conservatively.

There’s also a short-term risk of a reaction to the fluoride mixture if the child swallows too much during the procedure, which could cause stomach upset and pain, vomiting or headaches. We can avoid this by using precautions like dental dams and other isolation methods to prevent the child from ingesting it.

Using proper precautions and procedures, topical fluoride is a safe and effective way to give your child added protection against decay. Avoiding this destructive disease can help ensure they’ll enjoy good dental health for the rest of their lives.

If you would like more information on keeping your child’s teeth and gums healthy, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fluoride Gels Reduce Decay.”